Tuesday, April 13, 2010

More fonts for eBooks on iBooks on the iPad

[Update: With iBooks 1.1, Apple has changed much of the system for applying fonts. Please read Apple damaging ePub standards with pseudo-support and Apple kills fonts in iBooks, strikes blow to standards.]

Just a few minutes ago, I wrote that there were 10 possible fonts you could use when designing eBooks to be read with iBooks on the iPad, but it turns out there are several more, 44 according to this site, with 109 font styles in all.

I tried them out to make sure they work in iBooks on the iPad and sure enough, they did:

More fonts for iPad eBooks 1

More fonts for iPad eBooks 2

More fonts for iPad eBooks 3

That is, most of them did. I’m not sure what I’m doing wrong with Zapf Dingbats but I can’t get it to work at all, not even in TextEdit. And I don’t have sample text for the non-Latin alphabets.

Here’s the full list. If you view this page on the iPad, you should see all the font names displayed with the corresponding font. On a desktop computer, they’ll only display correctly if you have them installed in your system—and most of them do not come standard with either the Mac or Windows OS.

Remember: many of these also have additional styles (bold, italic, etc.). I’ll see if I can get a full table up.
  • Academy Engraved LET: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • American Typewriter: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • AppleGothic: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Arial: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Arial Rounded MT Bold: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Baskerville: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Bodoni 72: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Bodoni 72 Oldstyle: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Bodoni 72 Smallcaps: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Bodoni Ornaments: abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
  • Bradley Hand: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Chalkduster: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Cochin: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Copperplate: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Courier: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Courier New: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • DB LCD Temp: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Didot: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Futura: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Futura Condensed Extra Bold: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Georgia: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Gill Sans: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Helvetica: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Helvetica Neue: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Hoefler Text: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Marker Felt: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Optima: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Palatino: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Papyrus: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Snell Roundhand: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Times New Roman: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Trebuchet MS: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Verdana: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Zapf Dingbats: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
  • Zapfino: The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog.
There are also a number of non-Latin alphabet fonts:
  • Arial Hebrew
  • Geeza Pro (for Arabic)
  • Arial Hebrew
  • Heiti J, K, SC, and TC (for Chinese)
  • Hiragino Kaku Gothic ProN (for Japanese)
  • Hiragino Mincho ProN (for Japanese)
  • Thonburi (for Thai)
OK, can't resist. Just wanted to prove that they really do show in the iPad:
More iPad fonts

More fonts on iPad 2

    11 comments:

    1. Zapf Dingbats have their own unicodes, so if epub = xhtml = utf-8, use &#x???? character entities. If your current font doesn't have the character defined, the eReader should grab a copy from the nearest font that has one.

      If that doesn't work, i.e. no font substitution, bang the eReader on the head with a span font-family = Zapf Dingbats.

      Zapf Dingbats make a nice alternative to a series of asterisks when separating parts of a narrative. — riggle

      ReplyDelete
    2. That is pretty awesome, Liz!

      But now I'm confused. Clicking on the fonts popover, we get the default five typefaces...If we select one of those, it overrides the CSS defined typefaces? Then what...what if I want Helvetica Neue back again?

      ReplyDelete
    3. @kjkbook: I have posted the results of my investigation into the persistence of fonts in iBooks at the URL below. Basically, user-selected typefaces override the CSS-defined typefaces in "body" contexts like paragraphs, but do not affect the "non-body" contexts like headers.

      http://web.me.com/david.mundie/Linden_Log/Blog/Entries/2010/5/15_Persistent_Fonts_in_iBooks.html

      ReplyDelete
    4. Thanks, mundie1010! You and liz are doing incredible stuff on the iPad front!

      Hopefully iBooks 1.1 (or whatever) will provide a way to reinstate the original ePub state-kind of like Stanza's Styles setting...but better :p

      ReplyDelete
    5. Would it be possible to please post the ePub that was used to show the different fonts in iBooks please? Thanks!

      ReplyDelete
    6. Also, be sure to read The Palatino Bug blog post, or else you'll never see any of these fonts.

      ReplyDelete
    7. I tried to do it and for some reason, it's not working. So please post a sample ePub that shows how to do it. Thanks.

      ReplyDelete
    8. Hi, I don't know if this of any interest for you: I just managed how to embed external fonts with iBooks: http://ff.im/q3GyR
      In this image you can see League Gothic and Antikwa Poltawskiego.

      ReplyDelete
    9. Hi Matteo: I'm interested, I'm interested. Can you send me a file?

      ReplyDelete
    10. Does anybody know whether iPad supports ibooks that contain phonetic symbols (International Phonetic Alphabet)?

      ReplyDelete
    11. Hi Liz, this is the first time I get in contact with you, but I have read many of your articles. And now I have a problematic doubt and I hope you can help me with this. Well, I´m a young graphic designer, mexican, and here we´re introducing us recently to the ebook world, I even develope at this time my own epubs, but recently grew a doubt here at my work. My boss, young too, insist that there must be strictly 45-55 characters for a text column in ebooks (pdf) no more nor less. What do you think about this? I´m not agree, I´m sure that there could be so much more. So I ask for your help with this please, what do you think, how many characters do you use or how many is the optimum for one and two columns??
      I hope you can help us!
      Thank you so much Liz!

      ReplyDelete

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